The BBC isn’t Left-wing as such, it’s elitist

From Spectator blogs The BBC made a ‘terrible mistake’ in not reflecting public concern about immigration, Nick Robinson has said in the latest case of BBC self-flagellation. (Now I think about it, a sort of Maoist-themed programme in which Beeb executives denounced themselves would make great TV.) BBC bias is a subject I know a bit about, having written a pamphlet on it last year. I thought that, while the BBC is a much-loved institution, it must carry… Read on

Yes, many Catholic priests are hypocrites. But so are the new morality police – journalists

From Telegraph blogs, March 7, 2013 I’m sure many of you listening to Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor on Radio 4 the other day shared my disgust at how such a large and powerful organisation – one always lecturing the rest of us on morals – could be so full of sexual wrongdoers. But that shouldn’t negate all the good work that the BBC does, nor its central moral message. It’s just that, like the Catholic Church, its members are… Read on

It is television, not just the people who make it, which has a Left-wing bias

It is television, not just the people who make it, which has a Left-wing bias

Personally I can spot Left-wing bias on the side of a cereal packet, but I doff my cap to Ben Shapiro, the US conservative who has written a new book outlining the secret Left-wing messages that have been “pumped out” by television programmes such as Friends, Sesame Street and Happy Days. According to this paper: Conservative columnist and author Ben Shapiro accused television executives and writers of pushing a liberal agenda in several high profile American television entertainment shows. His… Read on

Attila the Hun and some barbaric stereotypes

Attila the Hun and some barbaric stereotypes

There’s a long-established convention in swords and sandals productions that the baddies (generally Romans) are played by English actors, preferably homosexuals, while the goodies (Israelites, Britons, slaves) are played by Americans. The BBC’s Attila the Hun (Wednesday, BBC1), despite being funded by the British taxpayer, follows this formula, but with Irish and Scottish actors playing the Hun and limp-wristed, lisping English southerners playing the Empire’s leaders in its pathetic, buggery-obsessed last days. This is a big risk – it’s almost… Read on