Thanks to the Amazon reviewers of 1215 and All That

Thanks to the Amazon reviewers of 1215 and All That

Thank you to all the Amazon users who have given such nice reviews of 1215 and All That, in the US and Britain. It’s much appreciated. If you’re a member of the commentocracy and would like a free copy so that you may further my ambitions, please email me and I’ll ask the publishers.

Yes, there is something special about the bond between mother and son

Me at the iPaper  Every morning our four-year-old climbs into our bed just before dawn, after which I’m sure I can feel him subtly trying to push me out and onto the floor so that he can lie in bed with mummy unchallenged. Various activities such as getting him dressed have to be done by his mum, something my daughters never cared about either way. Boys also show more jealousy and possessiveness, and last month he announced that “I… Read on

Open societies need to rediscover heroic ideals

At CapX Liberal, free-market systems work, yet their major weakness is an inability to give people the innate human need for stability, order, tradition and group membership – while the systems that offer these things tend to be terrible. So is it possible for enlightened democracies to provide a form of ersatz traditionalism, a free society with a reactionary veneer, and so stem the tide of anomie? A good example of where ersatz tradition does work is constitutional monarchy,… Read on

How capitalism tamed medieval Europe

At CapX European capitalism had begun in northern Italy, chiefly Venice, one of nine Italian cities that had surpassed 50,000 people by this point. Like Flanders, Venice was at the mercy of the sea but its isolated and vulnerable geography led to what John Julius Norwich called: “a unique spirit of cohesion and cooperation… not only at times of national crisis but also, and still more impressively, in the day-to-day handling of their affairs.” Venice was high in trust,… Read on

The first Britons were black. What does that say about Who We Are?

The ancient Britons were dark skinned, a new analysis of the island’s oldest complete skeleton has discovered. Cheddar Man, who was in his early twenties, was killed around 7150BC and his body remained in Gough Cave’s for over nine millennia before being discovered by workmen in 1903. (The Red Lady of Paviland is older but incomplete. He was actually a man but the man who first analysed the skeleton was a creationist who therefore concluded, due to the… Read on

Can you get ten out of ten on this language quiz?

First person to email, tweet or comment below with the correct answer I’ll send a copy of my new book, published this week, England in the Age of Chivalry (and Awful Diseases).   How many of the 100 most common words in English derive from French?* Which two European nationalities are named after the same tribe in two different, totally unrelated languages? Which English football club (top four divisions) has a name derived from Arabic? Which English football club… Read on

Headlines about cancer are chilling – but we should marvel at medicine’s ability to defeat it

On the marvels of modern medicine, at the i And yet even this statistic can be read in different ways, as can all mortality stats. The fact that “suicide is the leading cause of death among young men” is often cited as a condemnation of society, yet which cause of death wouldn’t be awful? A century ago it would have been pneumonia, tuberculosis or war that killed young men, and before that cholera, plague, hunger and homicide. “The Big… Read on

The Normans were the original liberal metropolitan elite ‘Remainers’

The Normans were the original liberal metropolitan elite ‘Remainers’

Originally appearing at the Spectator Coffee House, October 14, 2016 Today is the most important date in our history, the day on which thousands of men fought outside Hastings and England was changed forever. By the end of Saturday, October 14, 1066, thousands were dead, among them England’s king, Harold II, and most of the country’s leaders. As historian Elizabeth van Houts put it, ‘No other event in western European history of the central Middle Ages can be compared… Read on

Me, my voice, again. This time talking about Vikings this time

And my face too, looking a state (and I wasn’t even drunk). At the Future Nations vlog, talking about Alfred the Great and the Vikings.

1215 and All That: A Very, Very short history of Magna Carta

Is available from Amazon. This began as an ebook in 2015 and was last year bought by Skyhorse to publish in print form. The downside is that I lost all the reviews for the original, and as the Spectator’s Rory Sutherland wrote, when a company upgrades a product now they do not always give it a new name because they want to keep its positive record. (I realised this when I bought a mini-hoover this year which was… Read on