16 Comments
Apr 16, 2023Liked by Ed West

Mr Monbiot would do well to admit that he is an ideologue too.

You have to be an ideologue to be an activist.

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Apr 16, 2023·edited Apr 16, 2023Liked by Ed West

Lots of good links, in a, "We're doomed," way.

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Apr 16, 2023·edited Apr 16, 2023Liked by Ed West

This might be the best Sunday West yet! I'm always awake at like 4 AM USA time every Sunday morning for reasons I don't quite understand myself so it's always nice when one drops and gives me something to do.

A lot of people (Yarvin is one of them; he calls it "the religion of New England") assert that wokeness isn't just similar to Christianity, but actually *is* Christianity, or rather the next stage of its evolution as it sheds its theological aspects and becomes a secular creed, like Confucianism or something. Like Geoff Shullenberger calls it in this thread "a deeply American sort of hyper-Protestantism": https://twitter.com/g_shullenberger/status/1484986997370359808

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How anyone can think we are not on the cusp of an Orwellian totalitarian state when news such as the bias incident report is reported is beyond me. So many people I know seem incapable of the simplest dot connection. Love your work Ed, it reminds me I'm not completely barmy :-)

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Brand describes a direction of travel that’s broadly accurate, even if the details are often wrong. The WEF is clearly a very bad thing. It allows vested interests and the super rich to directly access and influence governments, without scrutiny and in opposition to state based democracy. It tends to create group think about important issues, has totalitarian impulses, and is the sort of technocratic, supra national body that tends to homogenise organic, national culture. Covid was real but its risks (in relation to the non elderly) were grossly exaggerated in order to manufacture consent. The suppression of information during the pandemic was astonishing, only outdone by the pivot, including by health practitioners, to supporting the riots (ostensibly) related to the death of George Floyd, because racism was a more important “pandemic” than the one that had, just a couple of months earlier, justified shutting down the world.

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I went through a childhood phase of fascination with Roman culture, and one that resurrects every now and then (off to revisit Pompeii and Herculaneum this June, along with the Greek temples of Sicily, and will be trying to see the great Roman mosaics in central Sicily that features scantily clad women exercising). As someone who grew up with clubby, congenial, non-dogmatic Christianity, what would I have been like in AD 400? Probably aghast at the attacks on the clubby, congenial, non-dogmatic temples and gods and cults. Perhaps. Who knows. It must be pointed out that the ancient empires and ancient faiths were not kindly. Christianity did substantially improve the notion of individual well-being and right of existence (which you have written about several times, Ed!). Is it better than paganism, warts and all? Worth debating.

Speaking of the collapsing western WEIRDism, have you read or followed Matthew Crawford?

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As a token of appreciation for Ed's fantastic site, and as a reflection of my carbon footprint on it, I've just upgraded to founder subscription.

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I love Gun restoration videos on YouTube. Generally find them relaxing and fascinating. You think about the factories and the gun smiths who made the guns. The people who carried them- were they conscripts - like Satre's lot. So I can understand that

Re with Starmer - Same with Sunak neither are objectional but politics is an art. The lack of instinct I think is a problem.Why not just have an a.i after all

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If we continue the analogy between wokery and the early Church, we find that the principles of Christianity seem to have remarkably little impact on the new political elite, that is, the converted Germanic tribal rulers of Europe. They retained their fondness for their traditional culture especially in the form of the brutal slaughter of friend, foe and family alike, along with polygamy, slavery, debauchery and all the other modest barbarian pleasures.

So unsuccessful were those who actually believed all that Sermon on the Mount stuff, that by the 10th century they had resorted to the Pax Dei which essentially said: please kill each other as much as you like but try not to murder priests, rape nuns and burn and pillage churches quite so much. If that's ok with you Mr Alaric, sir. Happily, in the following century, their Holinesses hit on the wheeze of sending the more thuggish elements off to distant lands to kill infidels, with promises of forgiveness and the likelihood of an early demise.

All of which suggests that neither Christianity or wokery make much difference to either human nature or political practise.

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