30 Comments

Without volcanoes we'd still have the Eastern Roman Empire and wouldn't have The Guardian? We really need to find a solution to this menace.

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Politics are not an instrument for effecting social change; they are the art of making the inevitable appear to be a matter of wise human choice. ~ Quentin Crisp

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Dec 21, 2023Liked by Ed West

The volcano which caused the Russian time of troubles was

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huaynaputina

You can see it from Arequipa which is Prru's second city. Arequipa is also on a volcano - Misti.

The Inca used to expose their children to the mountains.

I

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When people say, 'Populations that fall way below replacement level rarely recover' or some such I never understand it. Since we recovered from a genetic bottleneck of between 4,000 - 10,000 humans 75,000 years ago then why shouldn't, say, the Japanese population bounce back after going down to 100,000,000 people?

Some talk as though the course were set and very little can change it but why? If low birth rates were caused by overcrowding in urban areas then surely as these areas became less crowded then people would naturally have more children.

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There’s an interesting correlation between solar activity and volcanism - that as solar activity decreases (ie we enter a solar minimum) volcanic activity increases. Which is a bummer, since just when you need more heat, cos the sun has cooled a tad, you get volcanoes popping off to further reduce the temperature. We are about to enter a solar minimum, in 2025 or thereabouts, which will last until around 2050. So I forecast a few not insignificant volcanic eruptions in the next few years.

On the upside, the climate change / AGW hysterics will go into a complete tizzy, as global winter kicks in. Unfortunately, having screwed up the fossil fuel industry, many of us will die, of cold or hunger.

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Fascinating stuff

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The prehistoric volcano that 'occurred' 75,000 years ago is but one example of 'scientific findings.' Since the mid-twentieth century, nuclear devices and radiation leakage from nuclear power plants have so tainted our environment as to render radioactive decay dating questionable. If scientists were honest, they would admit that such dating is unreliable exceeding 5,000 years ago.

That is the least important, though in support of, observations I would like to make regarding this article. Most importantly, volcanic eruptions and other natural occurrences have a far more drastic effect on global climate than that caused by man. In addition, that climate 'science' has 'proven' that industrial pollution is taking us to the brink of extinction has been fabricated for political reasons should be obvious to any reasonable person.

As the dating of prehistorical material has been grossly exaggerated in support of Darwinism, the harping of climate extremists has been in support of the sociopathic, Malthusian rush toward population reduction; in both cases, and many others, 'science' is being misused for political purposes. Most of this article provides information in support of my observations.

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Fascinating.

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The amount of electricity storage needed to square renewable fantasies is unfeasibly gargantuan. However, most estimates only look at weather patterns going back a few decades, not accounting for rarer black swan events.

When the mania of our current politicians for weather dependent, intermittent generation runs headlong into a 'year without summer', all the traditional privations of such an event will be magnified as the lights go out.

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Very interesting. Of course I’ve known about the sunless periods endured post volcanic activity but never really thought about the extent to which human history has been so influenced by this mighty hand of nature. It certainly gives some context to the obsession of modern man (well, some, count me out) with trying to fine tune the earth’s temperature to 1.5 degrees above an arbitrary historic point when the earth can so dramatically have the last laugh.

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Absolutely splendid! Puts things into a meta perspective.

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Of the 20 largest volcanic eruptions of the last 2,500 years, ‘none fall between the death of Julius Caesar and the year AD 169’, although the most famous, the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79, did.

With Ed's correction, that makes Mr. Harper's sentence an odd one, on a par with, 'What have the Romans ever done for us?'

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The Tunga Tunga recent eruption increased the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere by 10% and will play into the global warming narrative for several years to come.

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I think we may be approaching another “bottleneck”

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founding

“Around 75,000 years ago”. As much as I love history and ancient history, and enjoyed this piece, whenever I read about something from more than about 2000 BC, I just don’t believe it at all.

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